Rashi / Ha'chomesh

> Client
G. Rosenbaum
> Date
1999-2003
> Lot Area
4,500 sqm
> Build Area
12,000 sqm
> Apartments
72
> Location
Rashi-Hachomash st. Hod Hasharon
<div><p class="p1" dir="rtl">^&nbsp;The building balconies are built at alternating heights, to create transparency or privacy</p></div><p class="p1" dir="rtl">˃&nbsp;The colorful diagonal wall on the street facade ends in a cubical projection and a balcony at the rear of the building</p>

^ The building balconies are built at alternating heights, to create transparency or privacy

˃ The colorful diagonal wall on the street facade ends in a cubical projection and a balcony at the rear of the building

<p class="p1" dir="rtl">˂&nbsp;This distinctive design enhances the marketing potential of the apartments</p>

˂ This distinctive design enhances the marketing potential of the apartments

The design faced a number of challenges: integration with an existing neighborhood of 4-floor buildings; apartments for young couples; street front with sun balconies at alternating heights; open areas behind the buildings, which were created as a result of the new building style.

The building proportions and the architectural context allowed a design with characteristics of the "White City": a white facade, a composition of planes creating movement, a typical window pattern, concealed laundry areas and other specifications. Diagonal colored walls were included in the "modern language," in order to give the building an up-to-date architectural context. The walls rise from the groundfloor lobby into the stairwell and up to the roof, serving also as support for the solar collector panels. The diagonal walls break up the "square matrix" and shorten the apartment corridors. The different colors in the diagonal walls give each building a separate identity. The irregular area behind the buildings was designed to give the apartments additional space and a view to the rear.

The design principle - up-to -date design in the "modern language ." A design that relates to the open area behind the buildings.

The economic principal - creating a distinctive neighborhood, enhancing the marketing features for each apartment.